The Need for Nurses in Schools

For many families that have children in elementary through high school level with special needs for medications, it has become a question as to whether or not the school that they are zoned for has a school nurse. Many schools in Florida do not have nurses on staff (Florida Association of School Nurses website, n.d.).   In one article by the Orlando Sentinel, it notes that not all Orange County public schools have a nurse, in fact, their ratio out of 182 schools in Orange County, showed only 34 had nurses. One Orange County school mentioned that they have an RN and she helps a lot because it frees up the teacher to focus on her classroom instead of the child that is sick. The article went on to say that some tasks are delegated by the RN to non-clinical personnel, for instance, an assistant principal or secretary when the nurse is not in the school (Roth, 2011).

In my opinion, although parents of children administer injectables like epinephrine for allergic reactions or insulin, they are the parents that have been taught to watch for certain symptoms in their child that they see day in and day out.  They have a working knowledge of the situation should it arise. The school personnel, may be taught when to administer medications like epinephrine or insulin, but if they have never used it, or administered it, how can they safely administer it? Will they know what symptoms to look for if there is a reaction?

In the state of Delaware, every school is required to have a registered nurse.  Some schools that have them receive the funding through the school system grants, or in the community (Roth, 2011).  I most recently went to a school that is private with an estimated tuition rate of $14,000 per year and service preschoolers through high school. The school has a large arts program and a population of about 2000 kids, each child receives an IPad upon admission to use for homework.  They stated that they did not have a school nurse, if a child warranted medical treatment of medications or breathing treatments, this would not be the school for the child.  I found it rather sad to see that value was placed more on the material things of an IPad (which I know can help advance a student) but really the computers work just fine; having a registered nurse to help in times of kids needing treatment, or a school teacher needing treatment is much more valuable to me.

References

Florida Association of School Nurses website. (n.d.). https://fasn.nursingnetwork.com/page/18381-school-nurses-save-money-

Roth, L. (2011, September 26). A nurse in every school? Not in Florida not even close. Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved from http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2011-09-26/business/os-fewer-school-nurses-florida-20110925_1_school-nurses-practical-nurses-students-with-chronic-illnesses

Rosie Moore, RN, DNP

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Source: Rosie’s Nurse Corner

Should APN’s Have a Higher Standard of Education?

Many people in the healthcare field ask if an advanced practice nurse should have a higher standard of education?  in my opinion, yes, an advanced practice nurse should have a higher standard of education.  They are the leaders that are setting examples for the new nurses coming on board.  If we do not improve the profession, then anyone can say they want to be a nurse but not have the right criteria to be a nurse.  Nurses are taking care of people’s health and in some instances the patients are critical; they should have a level of education that is higher.

Advanced practice nurses that are teaching our new nurses coming into the profession,  definitely need to be at a higher level.  If they are not teaching, then they are in management or conducting research.  A great way that they can practice their speaking in impacting our nursing laws is starting locally with the Florida Nurse’s Association.  There is a local chapter in many cities and they speak about nursing issues that are both at a local and national level. They have the ability through the association to bring it for review; in our state, for instance, they can bring the concern to Tallahassee so that they can get it resolved or even brought up nationally to Washington.  If as nurses we do not get involved in healthcare, then what will happen is we will allow politicians who are not involved in the day to day care of patients, to make decisions that too often are not good choices for our healthcare system.

Rosie Moore, RN, DNP

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Source: Rosie’s Nurse Corner

What is a Nurse Consultant

Nurse consultants are a nurse who identifies problems and develop solutions to them.  Once the problem is identified, then a workable solution can be developed.  Patients and their families can be coached through these problems.

Nurse consultants offer medical education to patients, family, and healthcare professionals.  The nurse consultant can create customized care plans for the patient in order to promote wellness.

Nurse consultants provide and develop new ways to ensure that a patient’s well being and safety are met.  They also provide an insider’s view on medical issues to legal professionals.

If you would like more information on having a nurse consultant for an evaluation of your needs, please contact:

Rosie Moore 407-760-1662 info@windermerebabyand family.com

Rosie Moore, RN, DNP

Visit my Website to learn more www.rosiemoore27.com
Follow me on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/rosiesnursecorner


Source: Rosie’s Nurse Corner

Changes in Regulations

Many states want to make changes that will impact nurses and how they practice nursing.  Advanced practice nurses (APN’s) should stay abreast of potential changes in relevant nursing or related regulations.  Nurses already have to take continuing education courses in order to maintain their licensure.  As an APN, the basic requirements that a registered nurse has to take are not going to be sufficient for an APN.  The best way to stay current is to join an association and become a member nationally and then join the local chapter.  Being a member of a national organization will allow the APN to get current regulations that affect the entire country and the local chapter will give the information that pertains to the state where the APN practices.  The local chapters of an organization can provide opportunities as well for speaking engagements where the APN can be involved in presenting a topic that is researched to also expand upon the APN’s knowledge (DeNisco & Barker, 2012).

References

DeNisco, S. M., & Barker, A. M. (2012). Government regulation: Parallel and powerful. In Advanced practice nursing: Evolving roles for the transformation of the profession (2nd ed., pp. 231-260). [Vital Source Bookshelf]. Retrieved from https://campus.capella.edu/web/library/home?deepLink=true

Rosie Moore, RN, DNP

Visit my Website to learn more www.rosiemoore27.com

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Source: Rosie’s Nurse Corner

Comparison of Theories in the NICU

The Roy Adaptation Model was known to focus on spiritual matters and promoting health amongst a family-centered type of care.  In the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), this especially holds true, because of the situation of critical illness faced daily, The Roy Adaptation Model helps families adapt to a changing environment and deal with the quality of life or in some instances death.  In the NICU, Roy’s model would work well as the nurses acclimate to the parents and what is happening to their baby. With Roy’s model, she indicates that health and illness are part of a person’s everyday life, this, in turn, will cause the environment to change in which they live. If the parents are to respond in a positive way and come out of it stronger, they will need to adapt to the change (DeNisco & Barker, 2012).

People will often adapt to a change in their life when they can respond positively to the changes that are happening around them.  An example would be the early premature birth of a baby, unexpected changes in the life of a mother and those immediately around her in the family are affected.  This will include other children, spouse and anyone else part of the family’s nuclear family, which in some cultures can be a very extensive family. That mother and father will use whatever coping mechanisms they learned in life to cope with the stress and the changes that they are facing.

There are three kinds of stimuli considered in Roy’s Adaptation Model, these will all affect the subgroup of premature parents in the NICU, because of the type of unit it is, a unit of uncertainty running high with emotions that go up and down.  In a different culture, the role of the nurse will differ.  For example, think about a mother that speaks a different language and is unable to get clear communication to and from the nurse.  A translator would have to be used to explain what was happening to her as a mother and then what is happening to her baby in the NICU.  For example in one article, there was a baby born early, with a mother that did not speak the language and the family did not fully understand what was happening in the NICU.  The family asked for their “Curandero” a community healer in their culture to clean the baby with an egg (Peterson-Iyer, 2008). The nurse needs to be able to use cultural sensitivity in explaining why this cannot be done, without offending the family but still including them in the baby’s care.

Jean Watson’s theory on caring can also be applied to the NICU because it is nurturing and will be needed in a critical location like the NICU. Jean Watson’s theory of human caring focuses on giving as an extension of self.  It is about instilling faith and hope in a person.  When a person is sensitive to another person’s feelings, it helps to build a trusting relationship.  It is important to acknowledge the positive and negative feelings that a person puts out to another person.  Jean Watson believes in her theory that we experience personal growth through teaching and learning as well as spiritual and socio-cultural well-being.  Jean Watson’s theory emphasizes spiritual and nursing practice, which in turn will promote caring and love to the patient.  This will then develop into a caring relationship.  The theory allows the nurse to understand the other person’s perspectives on things and form a mutual bond.  It also promotes growth when a caring environment is formed allowing the patient to be who they are and be accepted for it (Alligood, 2013).

The role of the nurse in Jean Watson’s theory is to instill faith and hope as well as build a trusting relationship.  In the article about the Mexican Indian family, Jean Watson’s theory would apply.  The mother in this instance speaks a different language that may be unique to the translation company that the NICU uses causing a barrier.  The mother, as in the article may be young and not have received prenatal care.  Their faith is going to be different from our own, as when the father of the child, wanted to use a “Curandero”, but as nurses, we must be able to provide culturally competent care.

References

Alligood, M. (2013). Adaptation model. In Nursing theorists and their work (8th ed., pp. 303-327). [Vital Source Bookshelf]. Retrieved from https://campus.capella.edu/web/library/home

DeNisco, S. M., & Barker, A. M. (2012). Theory-based advanced nursing practice. In Advanced practice nursing: Evolving roles for the transformation of the profession (2nd ed., pp. 361-377). [Vital Source Bookshelf]. Retrieved from https://campus.capella.edu/web/library/home

Peterson-Iyer, K. (2008). A difficult birth: Language and cultural differences. Retrieved from http://www.scu.edu/ethics/practicing/focusareas/medical/culturally-competent-care/difficult-birth.html

 


Source: Rosie’s Nurse Corner

A Theory for Post Partum Moms

Betty Neuman’s theory will work well with visiting post-partum moms in their homes after they have had their babies.  One of the things that I have seen while working in labor and delivery, is that the mothers come in with preconceived ideas on what breastfeeding is or is not, based on what their mothers and grandmothers know.  The family will say that back in the day, there was not any teaching on breastfeeding, you just did it. This can cause stress with the newly delivered mother and the family.    However, I most recently read an article and it spoke about a 17-year-old girl that came in with a complicated pregnancy and she delivered early sending her baby to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.  She was from Mexico but spoke a language called Mixtec.  This would make explaining about breastfeeding difficult and frustrating to the family and the nurse (Peterson-Iyer, 2008).

However through Betty Neuman’s model, if the nurse takes out a book that talks about breastfeeding, even if it is not in her language, she can point to the pictures and demonstrate what she needs to do.  Initially, this mother will be pumping her milk, since the baby may be too sick to drink at the breast, however, once the discharge is planned, she will need assistance breastfeeding and bonding with the baby.  It is through home visiting nurses, that these cases of mothers that are learning and have language barriers can have support for proper breastfeeding.

Betty Neuman believes that nursing should be approached from a holistic standpoint; physical, psychological, mental, social, cultural, developmental, and spiritual well-being.  As a person, Neuman’s theory considers the patient as an individual family member, community or society. The environment that the patient lives in can be external or internal.  Stressors that Jean Watson speaks of in her theory, produces tension in a person’s life (Alligood, 2013).

 

References

Alligood, M. (2013). Systems model. In Nursing theorists and their work (8th ed., pp. 281-301). [Vital Source Bookshelf]. Retrieved from https://campus.capella.edu/web/library/home

Peterson-Iyer, K. (2008). A difficult birth: Language and cultural differences. Retrieved from http://www.scu.edu/ethics/practicing/focusareas/medical/culturally-competent-care/difficult-birth.html


Source: Rosie’s Nurse Corner